info
Submit materials
Ok
Subscribe to Ezine
To manage e-mail subscription to Ezine issues specify your e-mail, please.

Confirm your password
Your session expired. Please confirm password

Password restore
Enter your login e-mail address below and click the "Send" button.
Instructions to create a new password will be send to you.

Knolee materials subscription

Career & Employment

Daily Weekly Monthly

  • RSS
  • Buzz it
  • Subscribe
  • Print
  • Favorites

4 PERILOUS MYTHS to avoid in your career and life!

Positioning or should I say extreme positioning has become a critical skill for competing with a sales and marketing edge. It's virtually impossible to remain a recluse wishing that we never had to come out from behind our computers.

4 PERILOUS MYTHS to avoid in your career and life!

by Don L. Price

Positioning or should I say extreme positioning has become a critical skill for competing with a sales and marketing edge. It's virtually impossible to remain a recluse wishing that we never had to come out from behind our computers.

Regardless of how compelling technology has become in influencing others to participate in our offerings doesn’t eliminate the need for constant contact with other people. Aesthetic values continue to reach higher levels of importance in the consumers purchasing habits. Like ability of advertisement, first impressions of company facilities, packaging, customer service communications, and yes most importantly, the value created in relationships has serious implications on the continued grow of a business.

Meeting those demands of aesthetic values and favorable impressions on others can be perilous, especially if it becomes an urgent drive. The urgent need to gain approval of everyone is an impossible desire to meet. The bottom line is that people have different tastes and you can't possibly please everyone. If you try, you will find yourself living in a bubble of universal popularity myths -- leading to anxieties and procrastination.

Flying high in your career requires that you see what myth is and what is rational. Dr. William J. Knaus says, "We act on approval-seeking myths to relieve social tensions." "These approval-seeking habits of mind inevitably lead to procrastination as we wait for the myth to become real."

Here are four examples of myths and the rational alternative suggested by Dr. Knaus.

Myth: Perfect first impression -- A conviction that disaster follows unless you make a perfect first impression. When you feel the pressure of having to make a perfect first impression, your hesitation and uncertainty ruins the impression.

Rational alternative -- Consider that though first impressions are often important, acting natural and showing interest in others is more important in creating a good first impression than worrying about how you are going to come across.

Myth: Perfect articulate person -- The notion that you should not express yourself unless you can do it in a highly articulate style.

Rational alternative -- Remember that ordinary conversations rarely translate into perfectly written text.

Myth: Perfect preparation -- this is the belief that you can not speak up in groups until you have read all the latest important books and completely analyzed all the current news.

Rational alternative -- You learn and contribute more by talking to people about what they know, rather than concerning yourself with discussing the thoughts of book writers and newsmakers.

Myth: Perfect complete comfort -- Idealized prerequisite to social interaction. You avoid any social contact until you feel completely comfortable and at ease. In the end, you procrastinate until the opportunity passes.

Rational Alternative -- Certain amount of discomfort is natural when you meet people for the first time. Feeling awkward is more normal than being comfortable.

****************end*******************

I found an error
  • 262
  • 0
Post a comment

Comments

No comments so far
warning
System message